The Key Missing Element For Black Achievement Is Getting Over Our Own Hatred For Each Other – Not What White People Think and Do

Part I.

A Counterbalance To The Assessment and Criticism From Forbes Article

I’m somewhat reluctantly going to respond to the Gene Marks’ diatribe, “If I Were A Poor Black Kid”, which has been lobbed back and forth on the Interwebs in a heavily contested debate about racism, paternalism and questions who really cares about what’s best for black children. I’d rather talk about traveling to warm locations and baking cookies, but given the sad state of accountability I have to respond. Any article that generates more than half a million PageViews in one week has obviously touched a nerve. Did Forbes fix the original title after reading LosAngelista’s critique where she mentioned it was grammatically incorrect?

Frankly, the article bores me because this topic has been discussed repeatedly, but no one wants to do anything to fix the problems it discusses. People have noted the symbols that identify lack of infrastructure, but fail to identify their true source. The vanguard CBC members can’t even get black voters to hold President Obama accountable for ignoring them.

Does anyone on the outside think a poorly-edited article from a guy with no skin the game, patting a few colored children on the head so a few whites who are still salty there’s a black President in office (for all the good it’s done for us) has any significance? The only people responding so vehemently aside from actual racists (and black male misogynists) are the ones whose inferiority complexes are showing: other blacks.

Why I am saying this? Continue after the jump to find out.

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