There Was Definitely A Little BWE In Obama’s CBC Speech

CBC Week wraps up its annual (I don’t know what to call it as I don’t know what the parameters to critique it are anymore) week-long event after a fancy dinner/dance and speech from POTUS.  A political speech is always a political speech, however some truths can apply. Mr. Obama referenced his focus on programs like My Brother’s Keeper did in fact FAIL to address the needs of black girls. Those were conversations we had online and how his largest base (black women) were being shoved aside for everybody else again).

His reference to the way our pioneering African American women Civil Rights leaders were sidelined by the [publicity-stunting, self-serving] males has been an on-going topic of conversation on these very pages for several years now  and it’s rewarding to see the work of vast networks of BWE and BW-centric digital spaces continue to pay off in shaping the zeitgeist.

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If Some Of Our Elders Wish To Speak Again We Are Ready To Listen

As a Black Women Empowerment (BWE) messenger who is uncompromising in the message I am very grateful for some of the historical contributions from those that came before us, who tried to warn us about the conditions and state of black womanhood.

We have paid it forward and thanks to prolific and profound writing and sharing our experiences via the internet some of the messaging has begun to make waves. While I’m not certain if it has permeated, there has been enough pushback and attempts at diluting the message, many have certainly taken notice.

Due largely to that bounced check of If you take care of me first I’ll have your back later between black men and women – where they’ve failed to protect and cherish black women and black children – we’re currently in a heap of mess right now. Since it is only going to get worse [maybe not for the Internet-reading audience but the masses] the time for reflection and deflection is done!

Other women can call themselves whatever they want and claim solidarity or try to shift the definition or distract from the seriousness of things but the bottom line remains the same. Some black women will always be more interested in holding on to a failed ideology and being mad at or threatened by those  other black women who set different parameters and want to follow new models and thought processing. Black women are sitting ducks for the DBRs and will be savaged in ways we attribute to 3rd world countries right here in the U.S. of A.


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We Need To Honor Dorothy Height With More Than Just Words

Civil Rights pioneer Dr. Dorothy Height can finally rest as she moves on to glory. She has duly been credited for her participation in establishing that legislation but she has also been a fierce advocate for women and children. As the Chair of the National Council of Negro Womenn  and after sitting on the board of the YWCA her influence can been felt by many even if they are not aware of its impact.

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Let’s Not Forget The Black Women Who Defined The Civil Rights Movement

I am reworking a previous essay from Aug 2009 in honor of MLK Day. While we want to honor Martin let’s not forget about Coretta! She like many women were the backbone that provided all the support that made it possible. Today, like every other day should be Black Woman’s Freedom Day in honor of all the women who risked their lives for Civil Rights but let the male “leadership” take front and center stage for the glory. We’ve continued to pay dues unreciprocated to help uplift a community that would have long collapsed. It is time for those who’ve sacrificed so much to relax and reflect, be rejuvenated and refocus their priorities on things that will uplift and sustain them. We now have our very first African-American First Lady and it’s time for that “change” to manifest itself across the board for all women.

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